Recreational Vehicle Summer Travel Check List

It’s summer travel time and when you own a Recreational Vehicle it’s all about getting on the road. Before you do, be sure that your RV or also called motor home is ready for travel. Many people store their RV and use it only during the summer months. When you get it out of storage go through these safety checks so you can are prepared for your upcoming trips.

Check your tire pressure and tire thread. Fill up the propane tanks and check for leaks. Take your RV to be serviced, have the hoses inspected, the lights, battery, fluids and brake system tested. Have an oil and filter change. Ask your technician to go over your recreational vehicle from top to bottom. To save money, do what you can before hand. The next step is to clean and go through the inside. Check your appliances, plumbing system, air conditioning unit, windshield wipers, etc. Do a thorough cleaning of the floors, walls, cabinets and furniture. Don’t forget to wash your RV before you head out also.

Then it’s time to pack! Go grocery shopping and stock up on the food you’ll need for about a week. Don’t forget the staples like spices, sugar, flour, rice, broth, tuna, coffee, tea, jam and jelly, etc. You can create a check list that you reuse each year. There’s also your hobbies to think about. Bring your books, movies, puzzles, bicycles, tennis rackets, golf clubs, etc. Fill up the closets but leave some room for what you may buy while you’re traveling.

Your trip is mapped out and your reservations are set, but before you think of leaving, check to see if your Recreational Vehicle Insurance is up to date. Don’t think that your automobile or homeowners insurance will cover your personal property, or injuries that happen in your RV. They won’t.

Stop or forward your mail. Stop the newspaper delivery and let your neighbors know how long you’ll be gone. Leave a contact phone number with a few people that live close to you in case of emergency. Ask someone to check on your home. You may want someone to go inside if you’re going to be gone for a long while, to do a good look over of your home plumbing, appliances, electricity, etc. If you have a neighborhood watch, let them know about your travel plans too.

Have a wonderful trip this summer in your RV! Knowing you have recreational vehicle insurance will help you feel secure while you’re on the road and hooked up at the campground.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of MemoryCatcher at Pixabay.com

 

 

 

 

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So Really, What does that Seat Belt Do For You?

One of the easiest ways of being safe in your vehicle is to simply wrap that seat belt around you and insert into the buckle by your seat until you hear the click. How many times have you heard or read a news story where someone has said, They are alive because they wore their seat belt. Just that statement alone should have you thinking, Why would you Not wear your seat belt?

Wearing your seat belt can be the difference between major injury, being paralyzed or death. The alternatives to not wearing your seat belt far out weigh the reasons you should.

The first seat belts were placed in American cars in the 1900s to keep people in the car on rough roads rather than to protect them in wrecks. Seat Belts were in race cars in the 1920s and finally in a some cars on the open market in 1950. In 1966, the Highway Safety Act and the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act were passed and the auto industry was regulated. Seat belts were on their way to becoming standard equipment.

So Really, What does that Seat Belt Do For You?

* Preventing you from being thrown from the vehicle in a roll over or heavy impact.

* Minimizing impact with your passenger and the dash board or windshield.

* Decreasing the time it takes someone to come to a stop upon impact by retraining you.

* Most important Seat Belts Save Lives!

Seat Belts are not just for the driver but for everyone in your vehicle, including your children.

See article for Child Safety Here

Buckling on a seat belt is easy, life saving and the law! Take those few seconds and make it a habit to have you and everyone in your vehicle buckle up before you turn the key.

 

Call us today to get your insurance questions answered. 863-453-3903

or visit our website budgetbirite.com fill out the form and we will have an agent contact you within 24 hours.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of koko-tewan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net


On The Roadways Travel Tips For This Memorial Day Weekend

Are you getting away this Memorial Day weekend? According to AAA auto club more people will travel this weekend then in the past 12 years and “39.3 million U.S. travelers are expected to take to the road, skies, rails and water, according to their forecast released Wednesday.

If you are one of those 39.3 million traveling on the road, here are a few tips:

DRIVE SAFELY
Drivers should be well rested and alert, use their seat belts, observe speed limits and follow the rules of the road. If someone is planning on drinking alcohol, they should designate a driver who won’t be drinking.
• Drivers should give their full attention to the road.
• Avoid distractions such as cell phones.
• Leave ample room when behind other vehicles.
• Use caution in work zones.
• Make frequent stops when traveling long distances.
• Clean the vehicle’s lights and windows, especially at night.
• Turn the headlights on as dusk approaches, or during inclement weather.
• Use high beams on rural roads unless approaching or following a vehicle.
• Refill the vehicle’s gas tank before it gets too low. If there is trouble with the car, pull as far as possible off the road.

PREPARE FOR THE UNEXPECTED
Travelers should pay attention to the weather forecast for their destination.
Travel and weather web sites can help them avoid storms and other regional challenges that could impact their safety. To be ready for unexpected problems:
• Carry an Emergency Preparedness Kit in the trunk.
• Pack high protein snacks, water, first aid kit, flashlight, a small battery-operated radio, an emergency contact card with names and phone numbers, extra prescription medications and important documents or information that may be needed.
• Travelers should let someone know their destination, route, and expected arrival time. If you get stuck along the way, help can be sent along the predetermined route.
If someone is traveling with a pet, here are some tips to make their trip more enjoyable right here.

Have a safe and very enjoyable Memorial Day Weekend

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of Sura Nualpradid at FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Can You Get A Ticket For Driving To Slow?

Yes, you can. You can get pulled over and get a ticket for driving to slow stating “Below minimum speed” as your offense.
Driving too slow is a block to the normal flow of traffic and getting a ticket for this is in the same ball park as getting a speeding ticket. Your fine and points will be determined from state to state. Simply put obstructing traffic by driving slowly is against the law and frustrating for other drivers.

There is a minimum speed limit just as there is a set speed limit on highways. If you ever notice people in the right hand lane have a tendency to drive slower then those in the left hand lane. A given rule on the road is while driving on a highway and you want to go faster then the other cars, move on over to the left lane to pas other drivers.

In Florida the minimum is 40 mph on highways with at least four lanes and the set speed limit is 55 mph. If you have a vehicle that cannot go the speed limit, moped head, scooter etc, then you cannot drive on these highways. Go with the flow just to be safe and avoid tickets that could impact your auto insurance.

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net


How to Be Prepared For An Auto Accident or Breakdown When Traveling

id-10095450Going on a trip or across town, accidents or breakdowns can occur. Being prepared can take some of the stress out of both of these situations.

You are required to carry your vehicle registration and proof of insurance with you, to be sure you never leave home with out them, keep them in a center console of your vehicle, if you do not have one, the glove box will do just fine as long as you have these two vital pieces of information at your finger tips.

The Insurance ID card shows your policy number, expiration date and very important, how to contact your insurance company in case of an accident.

The Vehicle Registration shows proof of ownership of the vehicle and when your license tag will expire. Be sure to keep the information updated if you move and don’t let that sticker that comes with this registration expire, or you may have to pay more for being late or get a ticket for an expired tag.

A check list in case you are in an accident may be provided by your insurance company but if not, here is some information you want to obtain from the other driver. Name, Address, Telephone, Insurance Company and policy number. Also be sure to get the name and badge number of the police offer on the scene helping you. Make notes about the accident while it is still fresh in your head such as, date, time, other vehicles makes, models, year built, color and license plate numbers. Take photos for future reference.

Other vital pieces of information you will want to keep handy is emergency contact numbers. The number to your doctor or a local hospital, and also the number of a family member or friend to contact in case of a serious injury in an accident. If you have allergies or are on any medication it would be a good idea to have your medical card or a list handy with your other items in your glove box or console.

A First Ad kit is not just for the home. You should carry one in your trunk in case of injury in an accident or maybe a breakdown and just changing a tire. Flares at night or cones in case you break down are great for making other drivers aware you vehicle is on the roadway and are able to be seen in the dark way before the other driver is close to your vehicle. You can also keep an orange reflective cone in your trunk for this purpose as well.

Fix it up on the go tools are very helpful. A tool box with screwdrivers, hammer, socket wrenches, which you may find handy to change out a battery. Contact your mechanic to find out what tools can be most useful for your vehicle in case of a breakdown to help you get back on the road or to a repair shop.

The Flashlight is always handy and be sure to check the batteries if you are planning a trip to be sure it works.

Whether you have been in an accident or had a breakdown, it can be a trying experience. Make it easier on yourself by being prepared.

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net