Driving Through a Storm Safety Tips

ID-10066768Driving safely on the road in pouring down rain and wet roadways can be a challenge. One of the things to keep in mind is the method of driving on wet pavement versus dry.

Just like a boat on the water, your vehicle can skid over the water in what is called hydroplaning. When your hydroplaning your tires lose traction with the pavement and you are now slipping and sliding over water. Worn tires, tires not inflated correctly, how fast you are going and the amount of water on the pavement contribute to hydroplaning. This is scary and the first thing to do is Don’t Panic!

Here are some tips to get your though hydroplaning safely.

Take your foot off the accelerator.

Do not step on the brake.

Shift the vehicle into neutral.

As the car is slowing down, steer in the direction you want to go.

Here are some tips to help you in a rain storm.

• Turn on your lights if they do not automatically come on. It is required by law but sometimes it is the smallest things we forget to do. This will not only help you see but will help other motorists to see your car on the road.

• Reduce your speed when you are approaching any sort of large puddle or flooded roadway. Decreasing your speed will increase the contact of your tires treads on the surface of the road and reduce the risk of hydroplaning in pooled water. (See tips for driving on flooded roads here)

• Stay a safe distance from other cars to avoid an accident. If they start to hydroplane it could cause them to come into your car.

• If you are approaching stop signs or light signals, slow down a bit sooner than normally and give yourself time to stop completely when you get to the light or stop sign.

Try to drive as smoothly and cautiously as possible. Avoid excessive braking and accelerating and be careful when going around corners, if you tires are slippery you veer off instead.

Maintaining your vehicle is vital for just a time such as a very wet roadway or rain storm.

• Make sure both your headlights are working correctly. You want others to see you in the daylight and at night.

• Check your windshield wipers. Replace the current wiper blades with new ones whenever there are any issues with it cleaning the windshield properly.

Your tires are vital for your safety. Get good tires that are suited for wet and dry conditions. Look more for quality then low price. Make sure your tires are inflated to standard of your vehicle. Well maintained tires can cut through water and more importantly keep traction better then worn tires. If you do not see good tread on your tires, its time to go shopping.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of jiggoja at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

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St. Patrick’s Day Fun Facts and Yummy Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe

id-100313807St. Patrick’s Day, will be celebrated this year on Sunday, March 17, 2019 by many people with delicious Corned Beef and Cabbage, green beer and wearing of the green. It is a tradition in Ireland for the people in the parades and celebrating on the side lines, to wear a lot or a small collection of green clothing. Even some with shamrock pins.

You can enjoy watching the oldest and largest St. Patrick’s Day Parade put on every year in New York City. This parade has been around since 1762 and will celebrates its 257th year. Get more information for times and broadcasts here

Just who is St. Patrick? Many sources agree his real name was Maewyn Succat. He was born in Roman Britain. When he was about sixteen he was captured by Irish raiders and taken as a slave to Ireland for 6 years. In those 6 years he worked as a herdsman, prayed daily and found strength in his faith.

As legend states, St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland. The basis of this legend is that the origin of the snake as a pagan symbol. Therefore the tale of St. Patrick driving out the snakes can really be taken as a sign of driving out paganism from Ireland. Patrick (Maewyn Succat.) died in 493 AD.

Corned Beef and Cabbage is it Irish?

Actually the traditional dinner of Corned Beef and Cabbage is not an Irish tradition but an American tradition started by Irish immigrants. The local meat in Ireland in the 1700’s was pork served with potatoes. Find out here how pork and potatoes become corned beef and cabbage and why it is the go to dinner for St. Patrick’s Day.

In 1925, “corned beef and cabbage” was voted to be the favorite dish of New York City.

We celebrate every year and usually have a big crowd. Lots of food, fun, friends and family make it all worth while to cook up a storm. Check out this Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe Favorite with Sides

If you are celebrating, please drink responsibly. Make sure you have selected a designated driver before you party. Please Don’t Drink and Drive.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

 

hoto Courtesy of Rattikankeawpun at FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Celebrate Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday With Gumbo Jambayala and More Recipes

Fat Tuesday or as the French say Mardi Gras is a day of feasting on fatty foods and living it up before the Christian Lenten (Lent) season and fasting.
This colorful holiday also know as Shrove Tuesday, comes with a parade of floats, lots of beads and fun in New Orleans and celebrated around the country. If you cannot be in New Orleans, then celebrate in your home with Gumbo, Jambaya, or how about a Muffuletta sandwich. There is great food and music that comes out of New Orleans and this is the day to join in the fun!

Check out these recipes…

Gumbo Recipe – When you say Gumbo you are talking Louisiana, New Orleans. It originated in Louisiana early in the 18th century according to Cajun History. Gumbo is personal, like a good stew, every home makes it with the main ingredients and some additional for their own taste and flair.
Main ingredients of gumbo are a good roux (mixing equal amounts of fat and flour to make a thick sauce), okra, vegetables (the Holy Trinity, onions, green peppers and celery) meat and seafood. The seasoning that finishes off the Gumbo is File’ powder which is a spicy herb made for Sassafras leaves that is ground down to a powder and available in most grocery stores.

Jambalaya Recipe -A Spanish and French influenced dish that has seafood, meat, vegetables and rice. A must have in this dish is sausage that has been smoked, seafood (crawfish is popular in the area as well shrimp) chicken and pork. Very flavorful with the spices added.

Shrimp Etouffee Recipe – A New Orleans classic recipe that is beloved by both Cajun and Creole cooking. It is served over rice with seafood as its star ingredient that could be crab, crawfish or shrimp. It was created in the 1950’s, but some historians say it could go back to as far as 1920.

Muffuletta Sandwich Recipe – This packed with flavor sandwich originated with Italian immigrants that came to New Orleans, using a round loaf of bread and stuffing it with olive salad on the bottom, Salami, Swiss Cheese, Ham, Mortadella, and more. This sandwich is made for a crowd or you could make them in individual sandwiches on smaller rolls.

The King Cake RecipeThe King Cake is used in some countries for celebrating the Epiphany twelve days after Christmas and up to Lent. There are a variety of recipes but the main one has spices of nutmeg, cinnamon and made with yeast. The decorations are colors that came from the Christian religion, with purple symbolizing Justice, Green symbolizing Faith and Gold symbolizing Power. They honor the three Kings (Wise Men) who visited Jesus on the Epiphany twelve days after Christmas.  These colors are used in the sugar topping that makes the frosting.
A small porcelain figurine toy or Fava beans were used for the baby that was traditionally hidden in the King Cake as a symbol to the baby Jesus.  Today luck and prosperity is the symbol of the baby to many. The person who finds the baby in their slice of cake irresponsible for throwing the next years Mardi Gras party in some countries and is a designated King or Queen for the day. The beans and porcelain figures are today replaced with plastic toy babies and some bakers are leaving the baby outside of the cake to lessen the chance of liability of someone choking or swallowing the toy.

 

 

Enjoy Mardi Gras!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of skeezeat Pixabay.com


Don’t Toss That Stale Bread! Many Ways To Put It To Good Use!

Who would have thought that you could put stale bread to so many good uses? The folks over at The Old Farmers Almanac sure did and they have quite an interesting list by author Margaret Boyles!

Did you know that stale bread dipped in milk was and still could be used as a poultice? This “renowned folk remedy” claims to help heal boils and pimples as well a remedy for splinters can be used with bread and cool milk.

How about cleaning up those small chards of glass you find even though you have cleaned up what you thought was all the broken glass? Yes, bread will help you with that.

Other uses on their list is for taking fingerprints of photos, cleaning out the coffee grinder, buttering corn on the cob and many more ideas!

Head on over the The Old Farmers Almanac article and see if you can put that stale bread to use with any of their suggestions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of Free-Photos at Pixabay.com


Sharing the Love and Valentine’s Day Treats

id-10026227Share Valentine’s Day by volunteering in your community with co workers, family and friends. Take a little time for this day, to bake up some Valentine cookies and cakes or you could purchase store bought treats and give them out with a special tag.

Take the family or a few friends and visit a nursing home in your area. Hand out flowers (a Carnation for each person) and Valentine cards. This does not have to be expensive and it will bring so much joy. (Call ahead to find out how many flowers and cards you will need and make an appointment.)

Visit someone who is under the weather with Valentines Day treats and offer to run errands for them.

Get your family and/or friends together and celebrate with a mini tea party. Serve hot tea and cookies. Have pretty paper, glue, scissors, paper dollies available to make old fashioned valentines day cards.

Volunteer at a soup kitchen for a few hours, washing dishes or serving up a meal will be appreciated.

Don’t forget our furry friends. Lend a hand at a community animal shelter or donate pet food or both.

Have a little brother or sister? Take them for the afternoon to a Children’s Museum or a favorite spot they like.

Check out our 50 Valentine’s Day Treat Recipes on Pinterest.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of hinnamsaisuy at FreeDigitalPhotos.net