The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 – When and Where for Your State

The last time the United States of America saw a full Solar Eclipse that crossed across the country was June 8, 1918. This Monday, August 21, 2017  you can witness this natural phenomenon, “The Great American Solar Eclipse”.  The ellipse will begin at Lincoln City, Oregon, at 10:15 a.m. PDT (1:15 p.m. EDT) and continue across the center of the US bringing a few minutes of darkness in its path to each state in certain areas, where other area’s will see a partial eclipse. It will end at 2:48 p.m. EDT near Charleston, South Carolina.

Warning!! It is not safe to view this eclipse without protecting your eyes.

One thing we have today that was not available in 1918 are Solar Viewing Glasses or also called Eclipse Glasses and Personal Solar Filters.(Sunglasses cannot be used in place of these viewing glasses).

Please see the following articles about the dangers to your eyes and ways you can see the eclipse without directly looking at it.

NASA Recommends Safety Tips to View the August Solar Eclipse

Preparing for the August 2017 Total Solar Eclipse (NASA)

How Not to Watch Solar Eclipses

Here are few places to check out when and where this will all happen:

TimeandDate.com – has lots of information and you can put in your city and state to see exactly when the eclipse will occur for your area and for how long.

10 Best Places to See the Eclipse – greatamericaneclipse.com has Maps and times available for the best places for the total solar eclipse.

Enjoy the Eclipse :}

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of artbyrandy at Pixabay.com

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Money Saving Tips for Summer Vacation Travel

roadtripfamilyThe tips in this article are for saving money if you are flying or renting a car for travel.

Air Travel

Airfare rates go up and down on a daily basis it seems, but a little research can save you a bundle and get the cheapest rates. There are sites out there that can help you find good deals like CheapFlight.com.

Car Rental

It’s the extra’s that can cost your more, but with a bit of thinking ahead you can keep that money in your pocket for travel. Rental car companies can charge you for a GPS system and child safety seats. Bring your own. Considering what type of cell phone you have, there are apps for GPS that you can download into your phone. If you are not sure which one will work for you contact your phone provider for assistance.

If you have a child, you already have a car seat for them. Bring it along when renting a car for travel, as many rental companies allow this.

If you are traveling state to state or city to city you will probably access toll roads that use electronic toll systems (e-tolls). These toll systems are to help traffic flow better with out having to stop at toll booth. You may want to get a toll pass (SunPass) here in Florida so you are assured that your tolls will be paid for ahead of time. Rental companies do offer this service and charge a daily fee and most likely the same pass.

Stopping for a bite to eat

You can save a bundle on your meals for kids by going to MyKidsEatFree.com. This site will show you a list of restaurants that offer free meals for kids under a certain age. Some on certain days and some all the time.

For adults, check out restaurants along your route by going to their websites. Most have menu’s and coupons or days for discounts. A little research ahead or using your cell phone can save you lots.

Happy Traveling

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of digitalart at FreedigitalPhotos.net

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Why Additional Living Expenses on Homeowners Insurance Coverage is so Important

Should you be faced with a fire, or a devastating storm that destroys your home, you will not be enjoying the comforts of your home and you need to be prepared.

In your homeowners coverage you should not only be protected for your personal belongings but compensated for additional living expenses. While your house is being accessed, you may be in a hotel for a few days, need money for restaurants, clothing and other expenses that may occur.

You do not want to find out after the tragedy of damage or losing your home, that you are lacking coverage. You need to know what your limits or exclusions are ahead of time.

This is where your compensation for additional living expenses comes in. Some insurance companies may give you unlimited help with your expenses and others a percentage of your total homeowners coverage.

Not sure what exactly your coverage is? Call us today to get your questions answered. 863-453-3903 or visit our website budgetbirite.com fill out the form and we will have an agent contact you within 24 hours.

We offer home insurance to the following states – Florida, Minnesota, Georgia, Texas, Maryland, South Carolina, North Carolina, Indiana and Pennsylvania.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of BM10777 at Pixabay.com

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Hurricane Awareness – Wind Damage – Flood – Storm Surges

Tropical Storms have winds from 39-73 mph. The are not as strong as a hurricane, but have the potential to do damage. Hurricane winds range from 75 mph and up. The stronger the winds the higher the category number for a Hurricane.

Category One – 74-95 mph
Damage to mobile homes and manufactured home that are not anchored, shrubbery, trees, some coastal flooding and minor pier damage. Loss of electricity. Storm surge 4-5 ft

Category Two – 96-110 mph
Damage to possible destruction of mobile homes, manufactured homes, roofs, windows, trees, shrubbery, small craft in unprotected anchorages. Loss of electricity. Storm surge 6-8 ft

Category Three – 111-130 mph
Mobile homes are destroyed. Damage to small residences and utility buildings. Structural damage to homes possible. Flooding well inland very possible. Loss of electricity. Storm surge 9-12 ft

Category Four – 131-155 mph
Extensive damage to loss of curtain wall (an outer covering of a building in which the outer walls are non-structural, used to keep out the weather.) Roof damage to destruction, damage to homes in general, flying debris, flooding, beach erosion. Loss of electricity. Storm surge 13-18 ft

Category Five – 155 mph+
Catastrophic Damage to what ever is in its path. If you do not have to be in a category Five Hurricane, Evacuate! Roof destruction, loss of any utility buildings. Major flooding to lower floors and all buildings and homes on or near a shoreline. Total destruction to mobile and manufactured homes. Extensive damage to homes and buildings. Flooding. Loss of electricity. Storm surge 18 ft +

If you live in a high rise building at the highest floor, you are likely to see more wind damage then on the lower floors, being the wind is stronger at higher levels. Lower levels may experience flooding, depending on the storm surge and category of the hurricane. If you are renting, be sure you have renters insurance, your landlords insurance may cover the building but not your personal belongings.

Hurricane winds are preceded by Tropical Storm winds and should not be taken lightly. Hurricane force most intense winds are on the right side of the eye wall. The eye wall (the inner circular formation of the hurricane) carry the highest winds and rain surrounding it. If you have the eye of a Hurricane coming over your area, you will experience a lull in the storm. This could be for just a few minutes to more depending on the size of the eye, how many miles across, and you do not want to be outside when the eye passes completely. The winds will pick up again for the other half of the storm.

Check your home owners insurance before a hurricane is near your area to be sure your up to date. Once a hurricane watch or warning has been announced you are highly unlikely able to purchase Hurricane Coverage. Flood insurance is not a part of your homeowners insurance coverage and you will have to purchase it separately and will take 30 days to go into effect. Even if you are not in a flood zone, when there is a hurricane in your area, you will run the risk of possible flooding. Purchasing Flood Insurance would be a good idea before the Hurricane season starts.

Contact Us today for a homeowners and flood insurance questions or quotes at 863-453-3903 or visit our website budgetbirite.com fill out the form and we will have an agent contact you within 24 hours.

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of TipsDave at Pixabay.com

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Recreational Vehicle Summer Travel Check List

It’s summer travel time and when you own a Recreational Vehicle it’s all about getting on the road. Before you do, be sure that your RV or also called motor home is ready for travel. Many people store their RV and use it only during the summer months. When you get it out of storage go through these safety checks so you can are prepared for your upcoming trips.

Check your tire pressure and tire thread. Fill up the propane tanks and check for leaks. Take your RV to be serviced, have the hoses inspected, the lights, battery, fluids and brake system tested. Have an oil and filter change. Ask your technician to go over your recreational vehicle from top to bottom. To save money, do what you can before hand. The next step is to clean and go through the inside. Check your appliances, plumbing system, air conditioning unit, windshield wipers, etc. Do a thorough cleaning of the floors, walls, cabinets and furniture. Don’t forget to wash your RV before you head out also.

Then it’s time to pack! Go grocery shopping and stock up on the food you’ll need for about a week. Don’t forget the staples like spices, sugar, flour, rice, broth, tuna, coffee, tea, jam and jelly, etc. You can create a check list that you reuse each year. There’s also your hobbies to think about. Bring your books, movies, puzzles, bicycles, tennis rackets, golf clubs, etc. Fill up the closets but leave some room for what you may buy while you’re traveling.

Your trip is mapped out and your reservations are set, but before you think of leaving, check to see if your Recreational Vehicle Insurance is up to date. Don’t think that your automobile or homeowners insurance will cover your personal property, or injuries that happen in your RV. They won’t.

Stop or forward your mail. Stop the newspaper delivery and let your neighbors know how long you’ll be gone. Leave a contact phone number with a few people that live close to you in case of emergency. Ask someone to check on your home. You may want someone to go inside if you’re going to be gone for a long while, to do a good look over of your home plumbing, appliances, electricity, etc. If you have a neighborhood watch, let them know about your travel plans too.

Have a wonderful trip this summer in your RV! Knowing you have recreational vehicle insurance will help you feel secure while you’re on the road and hooked up at the campground.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of MemoryCatcher at Pixabay.com

 

 

 

 

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